SERVIR-Himalaya

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SERVIR connects space to villages by generating geospatial information, including Earth observation data from satellites, geographic information systems, and predictive models useful to developing countries. SERVIR is a joint development initiative of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), working in partnership with leading regional organizations around the globe. SERVIR helps those most in need of tools for managing climate risks and land use. SERVIR’s activities in the Hindu Kush Himalayan region are implemented by ICIMOD under the flagship of SERVIR-Himalaya. 

With an overarching goal to improve environmental management and resilience to climate change, SERVIR‐Himalaya has been able to augment the capacity of ICIMOD as a regional resource centre to integrate earth observation and geospatial technologies for improved developmental decision making in the Hindu Kush Himalayan region.

SERVIR-Himalaya draws upon the professional, technological, and entrepreneurial expertise of different SERVIR hubs.

Objectives

  • Strengthen the ability of governments and other development stakeholders to incorporate Earth observations and geospatial technology into decision making
  • Advance free and open information sharing through national and regional platforms and collaborations
  • Develop innovative, user-tailored analyses, decision-support products, and trainings that advance scientific understanding and deliver information to those who need it

Geographical coverage

What is SERVIR?

Stories

Datasets

Large landslide dams are one of the most disastrous natural phenomena in mountainous regions all over the world Such dams are formed most commonly in tectonically active settings where high mountains border narrow and steep valleys and earthquakes occur frequently. Landslide dams are very diverse in terms of their formation, geotechnical characteristics, longevity, stability, and flood hazard. The two major causes of landslide dam formation are precipitation and earthquake. About 50% of dam-forming landslides are brought about by rainstorms and snowmelts, 40% by earthquakes, and 10% by other factors Geometry of valley in relation to geometry and volume of debris and discharge of damming river are some of the factors which are responsible for the development of landslide dams. Schuster et al. (1998) mentioned four groups of governing factors responsible for the spatial distribution of landslide dams. They are i) seismic intensity, ii) slope gradient and topography, iii) lithology and weathering properties, and iv) soil moisture and groundwater content. Landslide dams are generated by various types of mass movements, which range from rock falls and rockslides in steep walled, narrow canyons to earth slumps in flat river lowlands. Managing landslide-dam hazards requires an understanding of the temporal and spatial scales on which such phenomena occur. Many previous works on landslide dams have been mainly descriptive in character, and have produced a multitude of documented case studies and inventories (e.g. Costa and Schuster, 1988; Costa and Schuster, 1991). More recent work is focused on quantitative methods of determining the post-formation development, in particular, the controls on dam longevity.


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Large landslide dams are one of the most disastrous natural phenomena in mountainous regions all over the world Such dams are formed most commonly in tectonically active settings where high mountains border narrow and steep valleys and earthquakes occur frequently. Landslide dams are very diverse in terms of their formation, geotechnical characteristics, longevity, stability, and flood hazard. The two major causes of landslide dam formation are precipitation and earthquake. About 50% of dam-forming landslides are brought about by rainstorms and snowmelts, 40% by earthquakes, and 10% by other factors Geometry of valley in relation to geometry and volume of debris and discharge of damming river are some of the factors which are responsible for the development of landslide dams. Schuster et al. (1998) mentioned four groups of governing factors responsible for the spatial distribution of landslide dams. They are i) seismic intensity, ii) slope gradient and topography, iii) lithology and weathering properties, and iv) soil moisture and groundwater content. Landslide dams are generated by various types of mass movements, which range from rock falls and rockslides in steep walled, narrow canyons to earth slumps in flat river lowlands. Managing landslide-dam hazards requires an understanding of the temporal and spatial scales on which such phenomena occur. Many previous works on landslide dams have been mainly descriptive in character, and have produced a multitude of documented case studies and inventories (e.g. Costa and Schuster, 1988; Costa and Schuster, 1991). More recent work is focused on quantitative methods of determining the post-formation development, in particular, the controls on dam longevity.


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Earthquake-induced landslide hazard mapping is based on investigations in the Bahrabise–Liping area of the Sindhupalchok District. The information was gathered from existing maps, past published and unpublished reports, satellite images as well as field survey of some important failures. Seismic hazard analysis is a common tool to estimate the expected level of intensity of ground motion related to earthquakes. Seismic hazard is the probability of occurrence of a specified level of ground shaking in a specified period of time at a particular site. In seismic hazard analysis, it is required to infer the source of the future earthquake. To evaluate seismic hazard for a particular site or region, all possible sources of seismic activity must be identified and their potential for generating future strong ground motion should be evaluated. Seismic hazard can be estimated either by deterministic or probabilistic approaches. The hazard can be investigated deterministically when a particular earthquake scenario is assumed, whereas it can be analysed probabilistically when uncertainties in earthquake size, location, and time of occurrence are considered.


View Metadata

Earthquake-induced landslide hazard mapping is based on investigations in the Bahrabise–Liping area of the Sindhupalchok District. The information was gathered from existing maps, past published and unpublished reports, satellite images as well as field survey of some important failures. Seismic hazard analysis is a common tool to estimate the expected level of intensity of ground motion related to earthquakes. Seismic hazard is the probability of occurrence of a specified level of ground shaking in a specified period of time at a particular site. In seismic hazard analysis, it is required to infer the source of the future earthquake. To evaluate seismic hazard for a particular site or region, all possible sources of seismic activity must be identified and their potential for generating future strong ground motion should be evaluated. Seismic hazard can be estimated either by deterministic or probabilistic approaches. The hazard can be investigated deterministically when a particular earthquake scenario is assumed, whereas it can be analysed probabilistically when uncertainties in earthquake size, location, and time of occurrence are considered.


View Metadata

Earthquake-induced landslide hazard mapping is based on investigations in the Bahrabise–Liping area of the Sindhupalchok District. The information was gathered from existing maps, past published and unpublished reports, satellite images as well as field survey of some important failures. Seismic hazard analysis is a common tool to estimate the expected level of intensity of ground motion related to earthquakes. Seismic hazard is the probability of occurrence of a specified level of ground shaking in a specified period of time at a particular site. In seismic hazard analysis, it is required to infer the source of the future earthquake. To evaluate seismic hazard for a particular site or region, all possible sources of seismic activity must be identified and their potential for generating future strong ground motion should be evaluated. Seismic hazard can be estimated either by deterministic or probabilistic approaches. The hazard can be investigated deterministically when a particular earthquake scenario is assumed, whereas it can be analysed probabilistically when uncertainties in earthquake size, location, and time of occurrence are considered.


View Metadata

Large landslide dams are one of the most disastrous natural phenomena in mountainous regions all over the world Such dams are formed most commonly in tectonically active settings where high mountains border narrow and steep valleys and earthquakes occur frequently. Landslide dams are very diverse in terms of their formation, geotechnical characteristics, longevity, stability, and flood hazard. The two major causes of landslide dam formation are precipitation and earthquake. About 50% of dam-forming landslides are brought about by rainstorms and snowmelts, 40% by earthquakes, and 10% by other factors Geometry of valley in relation to geometry and volume of debris and discharge of damming river are some of the factors which are responsible for the development of landslide dams. Schuster et al. (1998) mentioned four groups of governing factors responsible for the spatial distribution of landslide dams. They are i) seismic intensity, ii) slope gradient and topography, iii) lithology and weathering properties, and iv) soil moisture and groundwater content. Landslide dams are generated by various types of mass movements, which range from rock falls and rockslides in steep walled, narrow canyons to earth slumps in flat river lowlands. Managing landslide-dam hazards requires an understanding of the temporal and spatial scales on which such phenomena occur. Many previous works on landslide dams have been mainly descriptive in character, and have produced a multitude of documented case studies and inventories (e.g. Costa and Schuster, 1988; Costa and Schuster, 1991). More recent work is focused on quantitative methods of determining the post-formation development, in particular, the controls on dam longevity.


View Metadata

Large landslide dams are one of the most disastrous natural phenomena in mountainous regions all over the world Such dams are formed most commonly in tectonically active settings where high mountains border narrow and steep valleys and earthquakes occur frequently. Landslide dams are very diverse in terms of their formation, geotechnical characteristics, longevity, stability, and flood hazard. The two major causes of landslide dam formation are precipitation and earthquake. About 50% of dam-forming landslides are brought about by rainstorms and snowmelts, 40% by earthquakes, and 10% by other factors Geometry of valley in relation to geometry and volume of debris and discharge of damming river are some of the factors which are responsible for the development of landslide dams. Schuster et al. (1998) mentioned four groups of governing factors responsible for the spatial distribution of landslide dams. They are i) seismic intensity, ii) slope gradient and topography, iii) lithology and weathering properties, and iv) soil moisture and groundwater content. Landslide dams are generated by various types of mass movements, which range from rock falls and rockslides in steep walled, narrow canyons to earth slumps in flat river lowlands. Managing landslide-dam hazards requires an understanding of the temporal and spatial scales on which such phenomena occur. Many previous works on landslide dams have been mainly descriptive in character, and have produced a multitude of documented case studies and inventories (e.g. Costa and Schuster, 1988; Costa and Schuster, 1991). More recent work is focused on quantitative methods of determining the post-formation development, in particular, the controls on dam longevity.


View Metadata

Earthquake-induced landslide hazard mapping is based on investigations in the Bahrabise–Liping area of the Sindhupalchok District. The information was gathered from existing maps, past published and unpublished reports, satellite images as well as field survey of some important failures. Seismic hazard analysis is a common tool to estimate the expected level of intensity of ground motion related to earthquakes. Seismic hazard is the probability of occurrence of a specified level of ground shaking in a specified period of time at a particular site. In seismic hazard analysis, it is required to infer the source of the future earthquake. To evaluate seismic hazard for a particular site or region, all possible sources of seismic activity must be identified and their potential for generating future strong ground motion should be evaluated. Seismic hazard can be estimated either by deterministic or probabilistic approaches. The hazard can be investigated deterministically when a particular earthquake scenario is assumed, whereas it can be analysed probabilistically when uncertainties in earthquake size, location, and time of occurrence are considered.


View Metadata

Large landslide dams are one of the most disastrous natural phenomena in mountainous regions all over the world Such dams are formed most commonly in tectonically active settings where high mountains border narrow and steep valleys and earthquakes occur frequently. Landslide dams are very diverse in terms of their formation, geotechnical characteristics, longevity, stability, and flood hazard. The two major causes of landslide dam formation are precipitation and earthquake. About 50% of dam-forming landslides are brought about by rainstorms and snowmelts, 40% by earthquakes, and 10% by other factors Geometry of valley in relation to geometry and volume of debris and discharge of damming river are some of the factors which are responsible for the development of landslide dams. Schuster et al. (1998) mentioned four groups of governing factors responsible for the spatial distribution of landslide dams. They are i) seismic intensity, ii) slope gradient and topography, iii) lithology and weathering properties, and iv) soil moisture and groundwater content. Landslide dams are generated by various types of mass movements, which range from rock falls and rockslides in steep walled, narrow canyons to earth slumps in flat river lowlands. Managing landslide-dam hazards requires an understanding of the temporal and spatial scales on which such phenomena occur. Many previous works on landslide dams have been mainly descriptive in character, and have produced a multitude of documented case studies and inventories (e.g. Costa and Schuster, 1988; Costa and Schuster, 1991). More recent work is focused on quantitative methods of determining the post-formation development, in particular, the controls on dam longevity.


View Metadata

Large landslide dams are one of the most disastrous natural phenomena in mountainous regions all over the world Such dams are formed most commonly in tectonically active settings where high mountains border narrow and steep valleys and earthquakes occur frequently. Landslide dams are very diverse in terms of their formation, geotechnical characteristics, longevity, stability, and flood hazard. The two major causes of landslide dam formation are precipitation and earthquake. About 50% of dam-forming landslides are brought about by rainstorms and snowmelts, 40% by earthquakes, and 10% by other factors Geometry of valley in relation to geometry and volume of debris and discharge of damming river are some of the factors which are responsible for the development of landslide dams. Schuster et al. (1998) mentioned four groups of governing factors responsible for the spatial distribution of landslide dams. They are i) seismic intensity, ii) slope gradient and topography, iii) lithology and weathering properties, and iv) soil moisture and groundwater content. Landslide dams are generated by various types of mass movements, which range from rock falls and rockslides in steep walled, narrow canyons to earth slumps in flat river lowlands. Managing landslide-dam hazards requires an understanding of the temporal and spatial scales on which such phenomena occur. Many previous works on landslide dams have been mainly descriptive in character, and have produced a multitude of documented case studies and inventories (e.g. Costa and Schuster, 1988; Costa and Schuster, 1991). More recent work is focused on quantitative methods of determining the post-formation development, in particular, the controls on dam longevity.


View Metadata

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